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Heather’s bestselling Kindle screenplay, the romantic comedy The Friends I’ve Never Met, is now 0.99 until Monday afternoon, Sept. 8th!
Heather’s 3rd poetry & prose collection “Three Spaces” and 1st collection “Where the Butterflies Go” are just $1.99 until Monday. Visit your nearest Kindle or Kobo today to take advantage of these super deals before Monday!
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An Interview with Heather Grace Stewart

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Leap, from the author of Where the Butterflies Go, is available for purchase at Lulu.com and Amazon stores worldwide.
It’s also available on Kindle, Kobo, iBooks, and where all fine ebooks are sold. You can also order an autographed copy via Paypal. Contact the author at writer@hgrace.com. Half the proceeds from sales go to Hearts for Change – an Educational Project for orphaned children in Kenya.


Here’s an interview with the author from 2010:

Questions for a Poet, As Put to Seamus Heaney

Q: Some years ago, Seamus Heaney told an English journalist: “My notion was always that, if the poems were good, they would force their way through.” Is this now your experience?

HGS: Absolutely. Sometimes it comes through in a matter of minutes; other times, I write down a few lines, and the rest follows maybe a day or a few weeks later. But if it’s good, it all ends up on the page…and then typed into a document in my “Poetry in the works” file on my computer, and then, if I still like it after I’ve lived with it a couple weeks, I put it into a “Poetry to publish” file.

Q: Over the years, Heaney often quoted Keats’s observation, “If poetry comes not as naturally as leaves to a tree, it had better not come at all.” Is that just a young poet’s perspective?

HGS: I think so. It doesn’t always come naturally to me. Sometimes I just need to sit down and force myself to write. Stop listening to the whining voice; shut it out, and just “do it.”

Q: Does this mean that a poem essentially begins for you when you find a form?

HGS: A poem essentially begins for me when I’ve found my voice for it; the form takes shape with the voice.

Q: Is there a poetry time of day and a prose time of day?

HGS: Used to be I used my early mornings for poetry and at sunset, and prose anytime, but now that I am a mother, it’s when I have a notepad, pen, and that spare minute when I’m not being asked to wipe a bum or put Barbie’s head back on.

Q: I remember Anne Yeats saying that her father mumbled to himself when he started to write. Would the Stewart household know that a poem was coming on?

HGS: In my household my hubby can usually tell a poem (for kids or adults) is being born if he comes home at 6:30 p.m. and DD is beside me doing a puzzle; a grilled cheese or rice is burning on the stove, and I’m soaking wet; just out of the shower in a towel with a focused look on my face, typing at the computer, “Just a minute, honey I have this idea…” And he’s so cool about that. He’s used to me by now. Now my daughter’s getting in on it, too. She looks at my face sometimes and says, “Mommy, what? Do you have an idea? Tell me, tell me, what is it? ” I try hard to be in the moment with her as often as I can, but the kid is smart, she’s onto me…so I usually end up spilling, because I don’t like to talk down to her, and sometimes, just by explaining it to her, she helps me better formulate the idea. Just wait, you guys are going to love our kids poem, ‘Cats Can’t Cook!’

Q: Do you ever feel burdened by the sheer amount of work you know it will require to do justice to a particular inspiration?

HGS: All the time. All the time. Right now, I’m trying to write a poem that’s going to do justice to this amazing group of people I’ve met online, and become close to over a year and a bit. Some might guffaw that you can make special friendships online. I beg to differ. I don’t know how I’m going to write something that truly speaks to this experience I’ve had. I think maybe they’ll help me somehow, because a lot of them are writers…actually, I’ve dedicated LEAP in part to them.

Q: How can you tell a poem is finished?

When it stops shouting at me. ;-)

Q: Do you keep a notebook of phrases and images for later use?

HGS: I have several notebooks, with penned poems/ ideas to type out later, and my images are saved on the computer by date.

Q: Does the poem come more quickly if there is a form? Would you be offended to be called a formalist?

HGS: I don’t think anyone would call me a formalist, but I definitely use techniques. Just not formally. Okay, seriously now, I’ve written haiku, tanka,
and Villanelles, using proper form. I just don’t like being weighed down by form. As Frank sang, I’ll do it my way ;)

Q: Do you have a preference for pararhymes and half rhymes over full rhymes?

HGS: I only use rhyme when it will only come to me that way, and even then, I hesitate to use it. I have to think about it first. I ask myself, is this form going to help the message or hinder it?

Q: Are you a poet for whom the sound the words make is crucial?

HGS: It’s all about sound for me. I love alliteration. Sometimes a poem starts out with words that sound great together; they just come to me and I have to write them down. For instance, I was walking to a Queen’s University class at 8 a.m. one rainy spring day in Kingston, and couldn’t get this line out of my head: ‘These are the days, quickly melting away,” (from the poem EQUINOX). The poem took off from there.

Q: Would you accept Eliot’s contention that the subject matter is simply a device to keep the reader distracted while the poem performs its real work subliminally?

HGS: To some extent. But I don’t do it on purpose. It must be subliminal. ;)

Q: What role does humor play in your poetry?

HGS: I don’t try to be funny. I don’t try to be anything. I just write the way I think, and I think people find my honesty refreshing and humorous.

Q: What are your thoughts about accessibility and obscurity in poetry?

HGS: Accessibility is probably my trademark: something I’m proud of and at the same time it’s my tragic flaw, if you will, because I’m so accessible, many journals wouldn’t be interested. I’ve managed to get several respected online journals interested, and printed ones in the UK, and even a Canadian textbook company sought me out. I’ve been published in international anthologies, including a very special one memorializing 911–Babylon Burning, edited by the great Canadian poet Todd Swift–and in a few print journals in Canada, but not the most “elite” ones–the ones that have been around almost 100 years. I’ve kind of given up trying because I don’t think it’s that important to me any more. I want to touch real people’s lives; not just the academics. I want to write something that might comfort a stay-at-home mom or a couple struggling with their love/ marriage or a depressed person looking for a glimmer of hope in a fast-paced world. I think the people I’m trying to reach are more likely to happen upon my poetry on the Net, not so much in the special collections rooms of their libraries. I know that people can understand my poetry without having to go look in some reference book (except for the odd references I make to items in the news, and even then I try not to be obscure) and that’s quite odd. But I can’t change the way I write. I guess I’m destined to be a Fridge Poet – the one that makes it to everyone’s fridge beside their kids’ finger paintings. And at the same time, to help a few children in third-world countries get the education they wouldn’t otherwise get. That’s just fine with me.

Q: And the avant-garde?

HGS: I’d love to be avant-garde. I’d love to be Avant anything. Ahead by a Century. That’s cool. I think some of my poems are there (for instance, my collection Leap features the concept of the Status Update as poetry), others, not so much, and I guess we’ll see which ones stand the test of time in 100 years. Well, no, unless I live to be 137, I guess I won’t see that. But whether they’re set in a classic or innovative style, as long as my words can touch a few people’s hearts along the way…for me, that’s really all that matters.

Thanks for reading! —Heather Grace Stewart

The Day You Looked Me In The Eyes

from the collection Three Spaces

The Day You Looked Me in the Eyes

 

I was walking and texting, looking down,

People talking on smart phones.

Heading to opposite sides of town,

A polluted sea of white, black, brown

drones carrying plastic clones.

 

Suddenly, our worlds collided.

We stopped buying into lies.

At first, our chat was one-sided,

Then talk lived where text presided.

And you looked me in the eyes.

 

We tossed out laptops, tablets, phones.

Left to our own devices.

How long had we lived like drones?

Wireless, yet lifeless, down to our bones?

We’d become our vices.

 

A carriage ride through Central Park,

We lay in the grass, looked to the skies,

All day long we felt that spark:

Fire on the beach, stars lighting the dark.

The day you looked me in the eyes.

 

But face to face tired us out.

It’s work to connect, we soon recalled.

ALL CAPS, less energy than a shout.

A Smiley, simpler than working it out.

So, back to our gadget clones we crawled.

 

I’m walking and texting, looking down,

People talking on their smart phones.

Heading to opposite sides of town,

A polluted sea of white, black, brown

drones carrying plastic clones.

 

 

Heather Grace Stewart

 

Ask the Twitterverse

Quote

Miley Cryus does some kinda twerk;
Twitterverse says that she’s a jerk. Image

PM Harper “twerks occasionally,” or so he thinks,
Twitterverse shares, with knowing winks.

Much ado about nothing
could be everything — who knew?

It depends what
the Twitterverse
thinks about you.

Book Giveaway Winners!

The FIVE winners of my book giveaway are…

Instant Drum Roll…

Sean Vessey, Julia Kovach, Kim Laroque, Peter Carter and Kathy Uyen Nguyen. They will have their books soon!

I just want to take this opportunity to thank you for supporting my career as an author; for sharing my books with others, writing reviews, & telling me what you did (and didn’t) like in my work.

Can you believe that it has been five years since Where the Butterflies Go was published?

Instant Surprise :)

SO much has happened since then. I’m grateful for those of you who have stuck with me on this journey since the start, and those of you who have ‘found’ this Page or my Twitter or blog and shared it with others.

I’m going into hiding a little now to finish my first long book of fiction, and hope that in the meantime, please, you’ll keep busy reading & sharing my poems and screenplay and the work of other indie authors.  In this fast-changing, confusing book industry, we need all the help we can get!

Much love and gratitude,

HeatherIMG_5078

No E-Readers In The Tub!

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Three Spaces

It’s now in stock, so get back in the tub, with your paperback Three Spaces, Rub-a-dub-dub!

NEW! CANADA  – paperback and Kindle  (or contact me to sign & ship you a copy using Paypal)

USA http://amzn.com/0986945897
UK: http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/0986945897
Germany, Denmark: http://www.amazon.de/dp/0986945897
Italy: http://www.amazon.it/dp/0986945897
Japan: http://www.amazon.co.jp/dp/B00BG2EJ9Y

Thanks for reading and for sharing these links with anyone you think may enjoy my poetry, and prose and photography.

Heather

FREE in KINDLE STORE: THREE SPACES!

I just wanted to make sure you all knew that Three Spaces will be free in the Kindle store today, May 9, 2013, through to early Sunday morning. Don’t have a Kindle? No worries, you can go to Amazon.com and download their free reading software for a Mac or PC, desktop or laptop.
Just wanted to give my readers a gift this Mother’s day weekend. Enjoy!

THREE SPACES FREE in KINDLE STORE

IMG_9235_2Heather

National Poetry Month Events

Hey there. I’m not sure how many of you regular readers of WHERE THE BUTTERFLIES GO actually live in the Montreal area, but I’m doing a few special events for National Poetry Month and wanted you to know about them in case you can attend.  Click on the photos to reach the event pages!
If you do attend either the Three Spaces book launch at Chapters Bookstore or the Herbs Café: A Night of Poetry & Music, please come say hi and let me know you follow my blog!

Best wishes, thanks so much for reading,

HeatherTSCHAPTERSTSPOSTER

Give Yourself Some Breathing Space

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Hey there!
Just a thank you to all you Kindle readers for picking up Three Spaces in THREE countries!
I am thrilled that it has been sold in the Canadian Kindle store (Amazon.ca), the US store (Amazon.com), and the UK (Amazon.co.uk)  It has ‘charted’ as #1 in Kindle Books>Canadian Poetry on Amazon.ca and also hit #7 in Bestselling Canadian Poetry Books!

Yesterday was a very good day. Three Spaces was on best-selling charts in all three countries! #82 on Amazon.com in Bestselling Poetry; #84 on Amazon.co.uk in Bestselling Poetry Books (just above Milton- wow- made me laugh!) ; #7 in Bestselling Canadian Poetry Books on Amazon.ca.

While I try to take rankings lightly, as it doesn’t necessarily mean I’m selling a ton of books but just out-selling others in that category, I do try to compete with myself every time I bring out a new book.

I’m thrilled to say that this is my best-selling poetry ebook yet! And the first one to hit three bestselling Amazon charts at once!

Three Spaces will be out on Kobo, iBooks, Nook Books, Sony Reader and more soon.

Please do tell your friends about Three Spaces (share this post!). It’s got prose as well as poetry this time, and full colour photography for those nifty colour e-readers.

Thanks again so much for buying & sharing!

Heather

Review of ‘Three Spaces’ by Best-selling Author Elisa Lorello

Full disclosure: Heather Grace Stewart is my friend. She also happens to be one of my favorite poets. And her poetry collections only get better over time. Her latest, Three Spaces, is proof.

Stewart introduces the collection by informing us: “We are living in an age of three spaces: public space, personal space, and cyberspace. This book is my attempt to connect, take apart, and examine those three spaces that co-exist in our society.” That she does, and more. As always, Heather Grace Stewart integrates verbal and visual by using photographs that splash simplicity and delicate beauty and partnering them with words that evoke the same. Every poem, every picture, every part of this book tells a story.

She also intersperses poems with short prose chock full of depth and introspection. “Everyday Heroes” is an intimate portrait of an early male figure in her life. “To Infinity, and the Bus” is a slice of childhood; and although the child is hers, we can’t help but re-live a moment from our own. Additionally, Stewart uses dialogue and lyrics to tell her stories, and we’re more than happy to join the conversation.

“Cyberspace” offers the most humor, I think. “A Twittertine” is a 25-word love letter that would’ve melted me on the spot, had I been the recipient. Stewart also examines the silent personal connections authors make with readers, one that can’t be measured or detected by analytics or metadata. As an author, I could relate, and it reminded me of just how important those face-to-face interactions still are.

Above all, this collection is a reflection of Heather Grace Stewart’s radiant spirit. She is both a witness and a participant of life. She embraces her inner child as much as she does her daughter. She appreciates and celebrates the little things. She loves and lives out loud.

Buy this book. Get hooked. Add it to your space. You won’t be disappointed.

~ ~ ~

Elisa Lorello is the author of the Amazon best-selling books  Faking It, Ordinary World, Why I Love Singlehood and Adulation. Find her books here

Three Spaces is available in Kindle stores worldwide and coming soon to Kobo, iBooks, Nook, & Sony Reader.