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The Fine Line: Emails from L.A.

“Your friend’s on T.V.”

“My friend?”

“Your friend whose name I can’t pronounce.”

“Ohhh! My FRIEND! Mr. Sitcom Actor!” I squealed, and ran from the kitchen, where hubby and I had been making dinner together, to the living room. It was three years after the Crazy Phone Call, and since that time, not one restraining order had been placed against me. Wait, that didn’t come out right. I have never had a restraining order placed against me. Seriously. Please, keep reading.

Mr. Sitcom Actor had, in fact, recently told me I should refer to him as my friend, “even though you’re in Montreal and I’m way over here in L.A.” It never surprised me when he responded to my emails—he’s a dear-heart like that—but I knew it was a rarity for a famous person in Hollywood to give a rat’s ass about someone who could do nothing for them. I enjoyed our rare yet lively e-conversations.

I caught the tail end of the ad that was on for his series, but it was enough to get me jumping up and down, clapping, as I always did when hubby told me my friend was on our TV screen. Our one-year-old was sitting in her high chair, and started clapping along with me.

“Dat? Dat dere?” she asked, big eyes blue and wondering.

“That’s my friend. Mr. Sitcom Actor. He sends me emails from L.A. Well, not really.
I email him, and he’s sweet enough to email back.”

“Nice haih, dat,” Monkeydoodle mumbled through her peas.

“Yeah. Yeah, you’re right. He really does have great hair.”

I’m going to stop typing immediately and clarify something before I get deluged with excited emails from you, dear readers. This is a fun game to play, keeping you guessing about all the parties in my story, but no, I didn’t get emails from McDreamy in my in-box. Patrick Dempsey wouldn’t return to our TV screens, set my heart racing, and make me put extra mousse in my husband’s hair until a whole year later.

As I finally sat down on the sofa, dinner plate on lap–this has got to be one of Murphy’s Laws–our daughter’s face turned beet red, and she announced an event to us for which anyone with an operating olfactory nerve required no announcement:

“Poop!”

I laughed, and was reminded of an email Mr. Sitcom Actor had sent me a few weeks back. We’d been comparing diaper duty–he’s quite the hands-on Dad and had admitted he and his wife were “knee-deep-in-it” –and, having read some of my poems, he’d told me I should write a Mommy Rap about changing diapers. “That would be hilarious!”

I never did write that rap. Life gets in the way; or perhaps that’s just not how it was supposed to happen. If I’d started practicing my rapping when Mr. Sitcom Actor suggested it, maybe I’d have learned to sing on key and sound bad-ass enough. But then I wouldn’t have earned my “The girl can’t rap, but she sure can write” t-shirt sent to me by The Sex People, along with a delicious strawberry cheesecake, delivered to my door.

Who the hell are The Sex People? I’m sure that’s what the cheesecake delivery guy wanted to know, with every inch of his being, since I wasn’t expecting him, and had answered the door in leggings and the new black stilettos I’d been modeling for my girlfriend Artsy Mommy. He must have thought I was running a very different kind of home business.

Back to The Sex People. The simple answer is I met them online when Mr. Sitcom Actor joked with me tongue-in-cheek, “Yes, Heather, let’s be friends, officially,” when I’d asked him if that was really him on Facebook—as if you have to be on Facebook to make your friendship official. He soon posted a link to a discussion board led by Mr. Screenwriter, which I thought looked quite interesting, so I joined.

Before I knew it I was online every day with a bunch of friends I’d never met, chatting about the in’s and out’s of screenwriting, sex in the movies, baseball, and our messy, beautiful lives.

It was the stuff movies are made of.

Read how this story started:

Prologue: The Fine Line (between persistence and stalking)

1) a-The Fine Line: “Do What You Want”

Read the NEXT CHAPTER: The Fine Line: I’m Afraid to Ask, but What Is Poking?

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17 thoughts on “The Fine Line: Emails from L.A.

  1. Hey H I love this post, particularly as I have also just hooked up with someone in the British media ‘public-eye’ on FB. It is exciting and affirming when one is in this situation, and I think what it tells a writer is ‘I may just be on the right track’.

    Re: Slam Poetry, we have it England too, and I have slammed in the past – but what I noticed is that it is usually the friends of the organisers who end up on the podium, u know; Also if u are 25, female and attractive, u might stand a better chance of winning
    than if u are not. This is not to say that there aren’t some good Slam Poems written – it’s just my impression that due to the mechanics of the Slam system, results can get engineered.

    Like

  2. Heather, your blog has changed quite a bit; and it looks as though you’re getting quite a readership! I remember when my blog reached 10,000. I was ecstatic. Now I want a million. I think your accomplishment exceeds my own. Readers aren’t coming to my blog to read about me but about the poets we already know. But I sense that your visitors come to read about *you* and are inspired by your life. Good for you. I admire your ambition. Keep it up. 🙂

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    1. Patrick, I appreciate that you realize it’s not about numbers, but about the lives we can touch as writers. After my book “Leap” came out, I did gain quite a readership, and I was surprised at how many of my readers were inspired to take “Leaps” of their own. Life is what happens when we’re making other plans, right? I hope we can
      work together to bring readers to each others’ sites–I want to put a link to your excellent blog on my site, so could you email me your avatar and code and I’ll put it on my sidebar? Thanks!

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  3. Hello Heather,
    I got to say you have many characteristics similar to my own.
    “Jumping up and down clapping!” I do this so much.
    AND…Your happy Heather dance, you’re as silly as me my dear.
    Poop…..hehehe, always when you’ve got your dinner!
    I remember it well…..lol
    Wonderful post my friend.
    Love and hugs.
    Lisa. xx 🙂
    Got a feeling you might like this, check it out, tell me what you think?
    http://alienhippy.wordpress.com/2010/07/04/hollie-mcnish-performs-language-learning/

    Like

    1. Actually, I am not a big fan of spoken word or slam poetry. Often, but not always, I find the readers use exaggerated hand movements and SHOUT at the audience in anger about some social/moral wrongs, and it’s just annoying for me to watch. Not my bag. Maybe that comes as a surprise to you, but hey, learn something new about me every day. Wet socks and slam poetry = painful for me.

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      1. My honesty probably just lost me a lot of poet friends. But the stuff is like fingernails
        on a chalkboard to me. I have yet to hear a well-written one, or maybe it’s well-written
        but I’m distracted by the over exaggerated rhythms and body language and the
        YELLING. And I love theatre, love performance! Oy. It feels good to confess.

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  4. The coffee cups are way more important than sex!

    On a day like today, when I’ve had several emails from students (which I don’t have to proof read, I just need to decipher!), I can let the odd slip through, especially as you’ve corrected it now.

    Like

      1. Yes. You Coffee Cup People; so intent on making your point.
        Hey, thanks for reading! I have no idea who else is reading. I’m writing for myself, for you, Maureen, and for the people who might have noticed I spelled your you’re in the beginning of this post at first. Ha ha …

        Like

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